Register as a User. If already registered LOG IN. Help this community by editing pages or by UPLOADING PICTURES.

Saint Helena

From Philippines
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Major Cities of Saint Helena in the continent of Africa

Saint Helena Photo Gallery
Saint Helena Realty



THE SAINT HELENA COAT OF ARMS
Coat of arms of Saint Helena.svg
LocationSaintHelena.png
Location of Saint Helena within the Continent of Africa
Saint Helena-CIA WFB Map.png
Map of Saint Helena
Nuvola Saint Helena flag.svg
Flag Description of Saint Helena: Saint Helena is a British territory and therefore uses a variation of the UK flag. It includes the Saint Helena shield that displays a three-masted ship and a representation of the island's rocky coastline.

Herbal Remedies and Medicinal Cures for Diseases, Ailments, Sicknesses that afflict Humans and Animals - HOME PAGE
(View Photo Gallery of Herbs)
Aloe Vera Astragalus Bankoro Bilberry Bitter Orange Black Cohosh Cat's Claw Chamomile Chasteberry Coconut Cranberry Dandelion Echinacea Ephedra European Elder Tree Evening Primrose Fenugreek Feverfew Flaxseed Garlic Ginger Ginkgo Ginseng (Asian) Golden Seal Grape Seed Green Tea Hawthorn Hoodia Horse Chestnut Kava Lavender Licorice Malunggay Moringa Oleifera Milk Thistle Mistletoe Passion Flower Peppermint Oil Red Clover Ringworm Bush (Akapulko) – Cassia alata Saw Palmetto St. John's Wort Tawa Tawa Turmeric Valerian Yohimbe
accept the bitter to get better


About Saint Helena

Saint Helena is a British Overseas Territory consisting of Saint Helena and Ascension Islands, and the island group of Tristan da Cunha.

Saint Helena: Uninhabited when first discovered by the Portuguese in 1502, Saint Helena was garrisoned by the British during the 17th century. It acquired fame as the place of Napoleon BONAPARTE's exile from 1815 until his death in 1821, but its importance as a port of call declined after the opening of the Suez Canal in 1869. During the Anglo-Boer War in South Africa, several thousand Boer prisoners were confined on the island between 1900 and 1903.

Ascension Island: This barren and uninhabited island was discovered and named by the Portuguese in 1503. The British garrisoned the island in 1815 to prevent a rescue of Napoleon from Saint Helena. It served as a provisioning station for the Royal Navy's West Africa Squadron on anti-slavery patrol. The island remained under Admiralty control until 1922, when it became a dependency of Saint Helena. During World War II, the UK permitted the US to construct an airfield on Ascension in support of transatlantic flights to Africa and anti-submarine operations in the South Atlantic. In the 1960s the island became an important space tracking station for the US. In 1982, Ascension was an essential staging area for British forces during the Falklands War. It remains a critical refueling point in the air-bridge from the UK to the South Atlantic.

Tristan da Cunha: The island group consists of the islands of Tristan da Cunha, Nightingale, Inaccessible, and Gough. Tristan da Cunha is named after its Portuguese discoverer (1506); it was garrisoned by the British in 1816 to prevent any attempt to rescue Napoleon from Saint Helena. Gough and Inaccessible Islands have been designated World Heritage Sites. South Africa leases a site for a meteorological station on Gough Island.

Saint Helena, island and British overseas territory in the South Atlantic Ocean, lying 1,200 miles (1,950 km) west of the southwestern coast of Africa. St. Helena has a maximum length (southwest-northeast) of 10.5 miles (17 km) and a maximum breadth of 6.5 miles (10 km). The capital and port is Jamestown. Ascension Island, approximately 700 miles (1,100 km) to the northwest, and the island group of Tristan da Cunha, some 1,300 miles (2,100 km) to the south, are dependencies of St. Helena. Area island of St. Helena, 47 square miles (122 square km). Pop. (2003) island of St. Helena, 3,800.

Geography of Saint Helena

The Land

Of volcanic origin, St. Helena has much volcanic ash and many conspicuous rock features, but volcanic activity on the island is now extinct. Perpendicular cliffs rise 1,600 to 2,300 feet (490 to 700 metres) on the eastern, northern, and western sides of the island. A semicircular rim of mountains north of Sandy Bay includes the island’s two highest points, Diana Peak (2,690 feet [820 metres]) and Mount Actaeon (2,625 feet [800 metres]). South of the mountains, water-cut gorges are dispersed, becoming deep valleys near the sea. Springs are numerous. The only practicable place for ship landings is on the island’s northwestern side at James Bay, from which a narrow valley extends 1.5 miles (2.4 km) inland. In this valley is nestled the town and port of Jamestown.

St. Helena lies in the path of cool South Atlantic trade winds, and its climate is temperate, with warm summers and only slightly cooler winters. Annual rainfall ranges from 8 inches (200 mm) at sea level and more than 30 inches (760 mm) at the island’s centre.

St. Helena’s native flora and fauna, which existed in isolation for millions of years, were devastated by the arrival of humans beginning in the 16th century, and subsequent introductions of alien species have continued to cause damage. Unique species still survive, however. The island can be divided into three vegetation zones: a rocky, barren coastal zone with cactus, extending inland for about 1 mile (1.6 km); a middle zone, extending another 0.25 to 1 mile (0.4 to 1.6 km) inland and supporting grassy hillslopes and gorse, willows, poplars, and Scotch pines; and the central zone, about 3 miles (5 km) long and 2 miles (3 km) wide, which is the home of the island’s many species of endemic plants (including the St. Helena ebony, St. Helena redwood, and black cabbage trees) as well as oak trees, cedars, eucalypti, bamboo, and banana plants. Animals native to the island tend to be small in size; they include invertebrates such as blushing snails and a variety of insects, as well as wirebirds (a type of plover).


Demography of Saint Helena

The People

The island’s population is largely of mixed European (mostly British), Asian, and African descent. English is the only language spoken, and the majority of the people are Anglicans. Jamestown, the only town on St. Helena, has about one-fourth of the island’s population.

Economy of Saint Helena

Less than one-third of the island is suitable for farming or forestry. Principal crops are corn (maize), potatoes, and green vegetables. Poultry, sheep, goats, cattle, and pigs are raised. Some coffee is grown for export. There are no minerals and virtually no industry, but some locally grown timber is used for construction purposes. Fish, primarily tuna, are caught in the waters around St. Helena; some is frozen at a cold-storage facility in the vicinity, and the remainder is dried and salted on the island. Virtually the entire output is exported.

About two-thirds of the colony’s budget is provided by the United Kingdom in the form of a subsidy; the remainder is raised from the sale of postage stamps and from customs duties and wharf fees. The island began developing tourism on a small scale in the late 1990s. Unemployment is a persistent problem, and many residents work abroad, especially on Ascension Island.

The only port, Jamestown, has good anchorage for ships, and there is passenger and cargo service by sea to the United Kingdom and South Africa. The island has a system of roads but no airport or airfield.

People of Saint Helena

The island’s population is largely of mixed European (mostly British), Asian, and African descent. English is the only language spoken, and the majority of the people are Anglicans. Jamestown, the only town on St. Helena, has about one-fourth of the island’s population.

Government and society of Saint Helena

St. Helena is administered by a governor, representing the British crown. It has a unicameral legislature, the Legislative Council, consisting of a speaker, a deputy speaker, three ex officio members (the chief secretary, financial secretary, and attorney general of St. Helena), and 12 members who are elected to four-year terms (though the governor can dissolve the legislature before the end of the full term, at which time new elections are held). The governor presides over and is advised by the Executive Council, which includes the same three ex officio members who serve on the Legislative Council and five of the elected members of the Legislative Council; the latter chair the council committees and oversee departments of the government.

Though the territory’s residents are British subjects, legislation passed in Britain in 1981 established that they are not full citizens of the United Kingdom, as had been traditionally held. This greatly limited the population’s opportunities for employment abroad, and the territory’s constitutional relationship with Britain continued to come under periodic review and amendment. A new constitution came into effect in September 2009.

Education is compulsory and free for children between the ages of 5 and 15.

Culture Life of Saint Helena

History of Saint Helena

The island was discovered on May 21, 1502, which in the Eastern Orthodox Church is the feast day of St. Helena, mother of the Roman emperor Constantine. The island’s discoverer, João da Nova, was a Spanish navigator in the service of Portugal. The existence of the island was known only to the Portuguese until 1588, when the English navigator Capt. Thomas Cavendish visited St. Helena on his return from a voyage around the world. The island soon became a port of call for ships en route between Europe and the East Indies.

The Dutch may have occupied St. Helena about 1645–51, but in 1659 the English East India Company took possession of the island. After a brief Dutch occupation in 1673, the East India Company was confirmed in its ownership. By 1673 nearly half the inhabitants were imported slaves, but between 1826 and 1836 all slaves were freed. The remoteness of St. Helena made it attractive to the powers of Europe as a place of exile for Napoleon I, and he was confined at Longwood House on the island from October 1815 until his death in May 1821. During that period the island was placed under the jurisdiction of the British crown. Subsequently the East India Company resumed control until 1834, when the authority of the crown was restored. St. Helena remained reasonably prosperous as a busy port of call until about 1870; thereafter steam started replacing sail in seafaring, and the Suez Canal opened (1869), changing the pattern of sea routes.

In the early 1960s a telecommunications centre was developed on the island of Ascension, and employment there of workers from St. Helena restored a degree of prosperity. St. Helena was given some measure of self-rule through an Order in Council and Royal Instructions in 1966 (effective January 1967) that provided for local executive and legislative councils; this order was replaced by a new constitution that became effective in January 1989. The territory’s relationship with Great Britain continued to evolve, and in July 2009 both parties approved a new constitution that came into effect on September 1. It included a bill of rights and limited some of the powers of the governor while giving more authority to members of the elected councils.

Saint Helena (Roman empress)

Helena, Roman empress also called Helen c. 248 Drepanon?, Bithynia, Asia Minor c. 328 Nicomedia; Western feast day August 18; Eastern feast day [with Constantine] May 21 Roman empress who ...>>>Read On<<<

Disclaimer

This is not the official site of this country. Most of the information in this site were taken from the U.S. Department of State, The Central Intelligence Agency, The United Nations, [1],[2], [3], [4], [5],[6], [7], [8], [9], [10], [11], [12], [13], [14],[15], [16], [17], [18], [19], [20], [21], [22], [23], [24],[25], [26], [27], [28], [29], [30],[31], [32], [33], [34], and the [35].

Other sources of information will be mentioned as they are posted.