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Blumea camphora (Sambong)

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Blumea camphora (Sambong) – Blumea balsamifera

Sambong is a tall, erect, shrub that grows in grasslands, open fields, waste areas. This strongly aromatic herb with elongated leaves, and yellow flowers can reach 4 meters tall at maturity. Leaves are used to treat certain medical conditions.

Medicinal uses:

  • Decoction of leaves is effective against fever, kidney problems and cystitis. Reduce fever by bathing in sambong water: Soak the fresh leaves of the sambong in hot water then letting the water cool down to a bearable temperature.
  • Leaves is used as poultice for abscesses.
  • Concoction of leaves is used for sore throat, rheumatic pains, stomach pains, and dysentery.
  • Fresh juice made from leaves is applied to wounds and cuts.
  • As expectorant, Sambong tea is used for colds
Herbal remedies in zamboanga.PNG

News About Blumea camphora (Sambong)

Sambong: “13 Health Benefits of Sambong”

By Dr. Paul Haider

“Sambong grows in the tropics and does a great job of lowering blood pressure, healing urinary tract infections, lowering fevers, helping with PMS and more.”

Where it Grows - Sambong also known as Blumea balsamifera, Lakad-bulan, Blumea camphor, Dalapot and many more names grows all over in the tropics of Asia and in the Phillipines where sambong is well known as a powerful healing agent. Sambong is also used in China, Korea, Thailand, Africa, and even India.

History - Sambong has been used effectively in Asia for treating all kinds of health challenges for hundreds of years. In fact in the Philippines sambong is registered as a true medicine with the food and drug department and is available in tablet form at pharmacies.

Diuretic - Sambong is a powerful diuretic that helps to detox the body and cleans the urinary tract… plus get rid of excess water retention.

Urinary Challenges - Sambong is well known for treating urinary tract problems such as urinary tract infections… and kidney and bladder stones. Because sambong is a good antibacterial and diuretic agent it’s a great choice for urinary related challenges.

The Philippine National Kidney and Transplant Institute recommends sambong to slow the progression of renal disease.

Lowers Blood Pressure - Sambong also lowers blood pressure like most blood pressure medications because it acts as a diuretic.

Antioxidants - Sambong contains powerful antioxidants that help to prevent cardiovascular disease, strokes, and cancer. Plus sambong helps to prevent and repair DNA damage caused by free radicals.

PMS - Sambong tea has also been used to sooth away menstrual cramps, help with bloating, and stimulate blood flow to the pelvic region.

Sore Throats - Sambong tea has long been used to sooth away sore throats and it works well as a gargle.

GI Tract - Sambong is a good antispasmodic agent that contains volatile oils that sooth away diarrhea, cramping, and irritations.

Liver Disease - Sambong contains methanolic compounds which might have the ability to slow the progression of liver cancer without toxicity.

Antibacterial and Anti-fungal - Sambong contains cyptomeridiol and icthyothereol acetate which have the ability in laboratory conditions to kill bacteria and fungi such as E. coli, P aeruginosa, B subtilis, S aureus, and C albicans and A niger.

Fevers - Sambong tea taken orally lowers fevers, and adding sambong tea to your bath also helps to lower fevers.

Oral Pain Relief - Sambong tea helps with the pain associated with dental procedures… just gargle with some sambong tea and the pain will disappear.

Colds and Flues - Because sambong contains methanolic compounds it can also help with the symptoms of coughs, colds, and flues.

Skin Wounds - Because sambong contains antimicrobial agents using the tea and powders on skin wounds promotes healing.

Forms - Sambong can be found as teas, dried leaves, powders, tablets, capsules, and many other forms.

Taste - Sambong has a nice menthol taste that’s very soothing to the stomach.

Making Tea - Take a heaping teaspoon of the dried leaves and steep in hot water for 10 to 15 minutes and then let cool and drink.

Dose - Drinking 3 to 4 cups of sambong tea daily… and sambong can be used for long periods of time without problems.

Side Effects - To date there are no known side effects to sambong. But as with any medication or herbal remedy women who are pregnant or breast feeding should not use sambong.

Finding - If you google “Buy Sambong Tea” or “Buy Sambong Capsules” lots of places will come up that sell sambong… and they even have sambong on Amazon.

Many people swear that sambong is a wonderful herb that will do your body good.


Sambong: The Plant Version of the Yamashita Treasure

(Ayala Land)

Several months ago, my mom was beside herself with delight when she discovered a sambong plant growing off one side of our sari-sari store. With the way she proudly announced it to us over breakfast, you’d think she found the Yamashita treasure. “Sambong plant, we’re so lucky!” she said. According to her, sambong cannot be planted or cultivated—it will just grow anywhere and the best you can do is to keep it alive and stronger until it matures. She swears by its life-extending powers, stating that her father used to drink sambong tea every morning before doing chores on the farm. He never got tired or hungry in the morning, never got fat, and lived to a ripe old age, thanks to sambong. I swear, with the way my mom markets this herb to us, you’d think it’s like she discovered the potion of eternal youth with a bit of Kankunis-like slimming effect thrown in.

Sambong, or blumea camphor, is a woody herb that can grow up to 1 ½ to 3 meters tall. It has a rich green color and has hairy leaves with a coarse underside. The sambong at our house is now taller than me, and I’m five feet tall. It’s typically used as a diuretic (meaning it makes you pee and flush the toxins out) and is prescribed for people suffering from edema, high blood pressure, hypertension, rheumatism, colds, fever, dysentery, sore throat and kidney failure. That’s quite a lot from this humble, sometimes random, plant!

The sambong has since then become my mom’s cure for all. Dysmenorrhea? Drink sambong! Tummy ache? Sambong provides an instant cure! Constipated? Sambong will flush it out! Who knows? I just drink it when she gives it to me, it’s good for me anyway. There are recommended ways of cooking sambong or making sambong tea (chopped, shredded, pounded with coconut oil…), but all we do is pluck some leaves and boil them whole in water for 5 minutes. Sambong tea by itself has a pleasant, clean and sweetish taste that makes it easy to drink even without adding anything in it. It also makes for a very fragrant tea bath, and it’s only second to citrus leaves for me when it comes to tea baths.

Sambong is also relatively easy to take care of: Just make sure to water it regularly, pluck off the bugs munching on its leaves, and prop it up when the bark is still soft and young. I hear sambong and pre-packaged sambong tea is out in the market these days and is very popular, but in my opinion, nothing beats the fresh leaves of sambong. So take a good look at the new plants growing in your garden—one of them may turn out to be this amazing herb!


Health Benefits of Sambong Tea

(Healthy Food Master)

Sambong takes a very good place In the herbal medicine. It grows in countries at east and southeast Asian continent. Naturally, the plant itself is mainly a weed which means that don’t require a lot of care to grow. Sambong leaves are used both fresh or after being dried. Another interesting thing about this plant is that Department of Health in the Philippines put Sambong in the list of the ten best herbs that are beneficial in dealing with certain disorders. And yes Sambong is probably the most frequently used herb in the Philippines. Beside that this herb is also used in Chinese and Thai folk medicines. Read below and find out what can do Sambong tea for your health:

Diuretic. This tea can work great as a diuretic. With inducing the urination it helps to flush out sodium and excess fluid from the body through the urine. So as a result of drinking this herbal tea you can prevent fluid retention.

Reduces Hypertension. Considering the fact that Sambong tea is a diuretic, it is able to incite the body to get rid of excess fluids as well as sodium. I am sure you already know, high levels of sodium in the blood tend to be a legitimate reason for hypertension. For this reason, having Sambong tea could actually help very much.

Antibacterial & Antifungal Properties. The marvelous components that showing these particular properties are cyptomeridiol, ß-carotene, lutein, and icthyothereol acetate, which have the ability to put a stop to harmful activities from microbes just like Candida albicans, Staphylococcus, Bacillus subtilis, Aspergillus niger.

Cures Sore Throat. A tea made out of Sambong leaves is told that can work as an expectorant that should help out with ridding yourself of mucus and phlegm, as well as curing a sore throat. It is additionally said that can provide elimination of the common cold and fever.

Relief from Stomach Ailments. Sambong tea may prove to be a good treatment for problems such as stomach ailments like diarrhea, spasms, or pain in the stomach.

Antioxidants. The ethyl acetate extract of the leaves includes a minimum of 9 flavonoids which work as antioxidants. It is widely known that antioxidants protect the human DNA from the harmful effect of free radicals.

Analgesic Properties. Amongst all of this benefits of this super healthy tea, it could actually act as an analgesic in affected individuals that need relief from pain after a dental operation.

Precautions and Warnings:
• Right now there are not enough studies of the utilization of Sambong tea by women that are pregnant or women who are breastfeeding, therefore it is best to avoid its use in those two cases.
• We mention above in description that Sambong plant is mainly a weed, it may trigger an allergic reaction such as itching and irritation of the skin in individuals who are sensitive to ragweed plants.

The Medicinal Benefits Of Sambong

(Affleap)

Sambong is a camphor aromatic plant which can be found almost everywhere in the Philippines.

It is a shrub that thrives in open plain, rolling to mountainous terrain of which it does not need a formal propagation because it grows together with other common weeds, shrubs and trees that are propagated by nature.

Long before the plant has been found to have a therapeutic value in the medical world, rural folks had it in the Philippines traditionally used the aromatic plant, by decocting the roots or leaves in the treatment of various ailments.

The shrub aromatic plant is among the ten approved herbal plant by the Philippine Department of Health (DOH) as an alternative medicine in treating specific disorders.

It is an anti-urolithiasis and work as a diuretic agent which helps dispose of excess water and sodium (salt) in the body.

Sambong has the essential camphor oils that is particularly safe and effective treatment of hypertension, dissolving kidney stones and other ailments, according to the Department of Science and Technology (DoST).

The roots of sambong is used to treat cough, colds, asthma, bronchitis, other respiratory problems while its leaves is used to treat stomach ailment, headache, mild hypertension, astringent for wounds and cuts, in dissolving kidney stones and it has been used as postpartum bath for women.

Sambong is not only used as herbal medicine in the Philippines, but it is used by the Javanese and Chinese as tea for the relief of cough, the Europeans used it in treating cataract infection.

In Cambodia for the treatment of skin infection while other parts of the world as treatment for dysentery, chronic uterine discharges, beri-beri and lumbago.


You Will Not Believe What SAMBONG LEAVES (Sage Leaves) Can Do to Your Health! A Must-Read!

(World Health Guide)

Sambong is a very common herbal medicine in the Philippines – used in traditional herbal medicine for the common colds and as a diuretic.

However, it is also used for infected wounds, respiratory infections, and stomach pains in Thai and Chinese folk medicine.

Its primary uses are as a diuretic – increases the production of urine. It can also treat symptoms of the common colds such as coughing, runny nose, sore throat, sneezing, headache, and fever. As a diuretic, sambong is an herb used to treat urinary tract or kidney stones, and lowers high blood pressure.

Sambong works as an expectorant, an anti-spasmodic and an anti-diarrheal, which treat various symptoms of the common cold. Furthermore, it is also used as an astringent for wounds.

It is approved by the Institute of Traditional and Alternative Health Care, Philippine Department of Health, and by the Bureau of Plant Industries of the Department of Agriculture.

Is has an active ingredients exist in the volatile oil, made from the leaves of sambong, which contain mostly limonene and camphor, but also traces of borneol, saponin, sesquiterpene, and tannin. Sambong is available as a tea – it has a woody taste with a nice menthol hint.


Herbs: Remarkable Health Benefits Of Sambong

By Cory Quirino (Columnist, Philippine Daily Inquirer)

While there are health issues that are not gender-specific, some diseases are more common in either men or women.

The health challenges that affect women include conditions of the reproductive organs or heart, osteoporosis, and cancer of the breast and cervix.

Health problems affect men and women in different ways. For example, here are some observations based on studies.

Women are more likely to die following a major heart attack than men.

Women are more likely to show serious signs of anxiety and emotional stress than men.

Sexually transmitted disease infections in women can be more serious.

Urinary tract infection (UTI) is more common in women.

But there are other health challenges that women should know about.

For months, 35-year-old homemaker Ana thought that her ultra-sensitive skin was due to stress. One morning, she could not stand the alternating episodes of pain, exhaustion and numbness any longer.

A rheumatologist explained matters to her. Laboratory tests and physical examination will not detect this common condition for women called fibromyalgia. There are tender points in the body. And if you have more than 10 painful areas, then you are suffering from this problem.

Natural remedies include mind-body massage and stress relievers like calming music. It has been noted that patients who are emotionally stressed experience more pain.

Imbalances

Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) knows no cause. It is suspected that there are dormant viral infections, stress and hormonal imbalances which could act as its trigger.

Women in their 40s and 50s are more prone to suffering from this debilitating disorder. CFS doesn’t improve with stress. It can make one deteriorate to the point of inability to do simple chores like cleaning up a room.

There are no tests to detect CFS, which is why doctors will have to rule out thyroid problems, depression, Lyme disease and mononucleosis.

While there is a medication to ease the symptoms, doctors recommend mild exercise and avoidance of caffeine and alcohol. Also, once the hormones are balanced, relief is experienced.

Lupus, an autoimmune disorder, is often discovered in patients aged between 15 and 45. An alarming 90 percent are women.

Scientists believe that hormones may be the culprit. Symptoms include painless mouth sores, low red blood cell or white blood cell count, facial or body rash after sun exposure and kidney disease.

Apart from corticosteroids, doctors recommend a diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids, stress management and increased physical activity.

Polycystic ovary syndrome is a hormonal problem that affects one in 10 women of child-bearing age. This is due to abnormal levels of male hormones (androgens) caused by insulin imbalance.

Its symptoms are rapid weight gain, acne and baldness. While there in no known cure, medications to regulate insulin levels are prescribed. This, plus a healthy regimen, is recommended.

Nerve damage

Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune problem that attacks the myelin (protective covering) of the nerves, which eventually leads to nerve damage. This disease affects more women than men, detected between the ages of 20 and 40.

The symptoms are numbness, fatigue, vision problems, tingling and weakness in the limbs. There are medical protocols addressing this condition. Doctors recommend exercise to improve muscle strength, rest and avoidance of heat.

Irritable bowel syndrome symptoms are gas, diarrhea, constipation and abdominal pain. Common in women, this bothersome condition can be treated with medication. However, medical experts advise the following: consumption of vegetables and fruits, fiber supplements and more whole grains.

There are millions suffering from urinary tract infection sufferers worldwide. Most of them are women. The unpleasant symptoms are burning pain while peeing, or a feeling of a full bladder even when it is empty. There is a percentage of women who test negative for bacterial infection.

While lab tests are not infallible, findings suggest that women with UTI may have a negative test, but could still harbor the E. coli bacteria in their body.

Tips from the experts: strict hygiene, proper hygiene methods (note: direction of wiping the genital area is from the front to back) and hydration (10-15 glasses of water daily). Doctors advice women to empty the bladder after intercourse. Never restrain yourself at any time.

Other remedies are cranberry juice, coconut water, and sambong tea or tablets thrice daily.

The operative advice is, don’t hold it. Avoid feminine products with harsh ingredients, do not douche unless suggested by your gynecologist and avoid tight jeans, especially during summer.

Prevention is still the best policy to adopt for health management. If women were more aware of themselves—body, mind and spirit—then the risks for contracting a disease could be reduced dramatically. Begin with self-awareness.

This week’s affirmation: “I am a perfect being, whole and complete.”

Love and light!


Herbs: Remarkable Health Benefits Of Sambong

By Chan Beran

Sambong, also known as Blumea balsamifera,” or “Blumea camphor,” is an aromatic shrub that grows from one to four meters in height. It is a shrub that grows in the wild tropical climate countries such as Philippines, India, Africa and even in the eastern Himalayas.

Sambong is one of 10 Medicinal Plants in the Philippines endorsed by DOH. Sambong is a true medicine with food and drug department and is available in a tablet and at pharmacies.

It is prized in the Philippines for its medicinal properties.Among these is its diuretic property, which helps release water from the body. It is considered as a powerful diuretic that helps detox the body and cleanse the urinary tract.

It can also pass urinary stone through the urine. In fact, it is a well-known fro treating urinary tract problems such as urinary tract infections, kidney and bladder stones.

The Philippine National Kidney and Transplant Institute recommends sambong to slow of renal disease.

Usage and intake:

Sambong leaves are taken as a tea. The Fresh leaves can be chopped into small pieces. Then washed them under the running water thoroughly. Put the chopped leaves into a liter of boiling water for 10 minutes. Then let the tea cool.

The tea may be taken four times a day.

In the Philippines, Sambong is a good remedy relieve arthritis and cough.

To prepare this, You need to crush or grind the leaves into a paste and apply directly to the affected part.

To relieve fever, crushed Sambong leaves and soaked in a cold water, wrung out and placed between the sheets of clean cloth.

The cloth with the Sambong can be placed on the patient’s forehead or armpit to lower the body temperature and prevent convolutions.

Many people swear that sambong is a wonderful herb that will do make your body better. It’s a great herb that can lower blood pressure, healing urinary tract infections, lowering fevers and more.


Sambong Health Benefits And You Must Include In Your Diet

(News Health Today)

Sambong is plant widely considered as an herbal medicine. It grows in East and Southeast Asian countries. This plant resembles the appearance of weed and it grows with little to no care. It is said that sambong smells and tastes like camphor. Also, this plant possesses properties that help in cleansing the kidney.

The leaves of the sambong plant can be used fresh or dried. In the Philippines, the sambong plant is listed by the Department of Health as one of the top 10 most effective herbs that treat different illnesses. Even in China and Thailand, sambong is used for different health disorders.

The tea made from sambong is used for the treatment of kidney stones and a hypertension cure. Furthermore, it is considered to fight off diarrhea, as well as cure for cold and UTI (urinary tract infections).

What Are The Major Benefits Of Sambong?

1. Helps lower blood pressure – Sambong may help in lowering blood pressure. It acts by removing excess sodium from the blood. Sodium is known to increase the blood pressure resulting to hypertension.

2. Acts as a diuretic – It is known to work as a diuretic. It helps flush excess fluid from the body through the form of urine. Therefore, sambong can help prevent fluid retention.

3. Sore throat relief – Sambong also acts as an expectorant. It aids in eliminating phlegm and mucus. It is believed that this herb can help cure common cold and fever.

4. Serves as an analgesic – Drinking sambong tea can also help relieve pain, especially after dental operations.

5. Cure stomach ache – If you are suffering from diarrhea, stomach pain and spasm, drinking sambong tea is a good idea. It helps soothe the stomach and treat any of these problems.

6. Source of antioxidants – It is known that sambong also has flavonoids. These are pigments from plants that contain antioxidants. Antioxidants are know to fight off free radicals within the body and boost the immune system.

Warnings Before Using Sambong

Never use sambong if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Although there’s no sufficient studies about the effects of this plant to pregnant women and breastfeeding moms, it is imperative to avoid it. Also, it might cause allergic reaction such as skin irritation and itching. So, people with hypersensitivity to plants like this must avoid it.

Sambong is a good herbal remedy for you. It packs several effects that you wanted to optimize health. Plus, it virtually doesn’t have any side effects. Try considering using sambong, because of its amazing benefits for the health.



Sambong Tea for Kidney Stones and Kidney Cleansing and Menstruation Cramps

(Good Samaritan, My Health Blog)

Our gem of a maid is truly wonderful. She plants and plants useful stuff in the garden. This time I was looking for Sambong and there was nowhere in the village, but she planted some in some corner of the garden. She got me a handful of leaves to turn into tea. Just add a liter of water and you come out with a cup full of thick tea.

Arlene said Sambong is useful for menstruating women to get rid of their menstruation cramps. Romy the beam ray expert says to use Sambong to clean the kidneys. The department of health and the kidney institute use sambong tea to help dissolve renal stones and to avert dialysis and to avert kidney transplant… meaning… this herbal concoction works powerfully and we must explore exactly how to use and when to use it in combination with what.

Come to think of it, with dehydration, my right kidney had some dull feeling. But when the beam ray and the water drinking it coerced me into and the pulling of uric acid through my feet in the foot bath… seems to have helped remove the dull sensation in my right kidney.

I may get into doing that water cure with a little salt. Also look into magnetizing our water like Romy.

So I drank 1 cup of the sambong tea. Didn’t taste bad. I need to study more, ask around for the dosage.

Sambong tea is available commercially if you are curious and do not live in the Philippines. I just do not know how effective dried leaves are compared to freshly picked.

Here is a picture of my sambong leaves. The sambong tea was green.

http://www.myhealthblog.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/sambong-tea-fresh-leaves-myhealthblog_org.jpg

Sambong tea is a Philippine government recognized herb that helps with kidney stones and kidney cleansing in general. Where kidney cleansing is linked in the relief of high blood pressure as it is the heart’s job to pump blood through the kidneys for cleansing.


7 Health Benefits of Sambong Tea You Probably Never Knew

(Live Longer)

Sambong tea is derived from a flowering plant called Blumea balsamifera. It belongs to the Blumea genus, Asteraceae family. It is commonly known as sambong in the Philippines.

Widely popular in the Philippines, The Philippine Council For Health Research and Development (PCHRD) and The Philippine Department of Health (PDOH) are promoting Sambong tea and its tablets for the treatment of kidney stones.

Concerning this, today we will tell you what medicinal properties does Sambong tea has and what kind of benefits does it have on our health. You can find this plant in the subtropical and tropical zones of Asia, mainly in the Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia.

Top 7 Amazing Health Benefits Of Sambong Tea

https://www.livealittlelonger.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Health-Benefits-Of-Sambong-Tea-1.jpg

1. It Cures Diarrhea and Stomach Problems

When ingested under the right guidance of a naturopathy physician, the sambong oil (constituents – borneol, camphor, caryophyllene oxide, α-terpineol, β-caryophyllene, and terpineol) can soothe your gastrointestinal tract, reduce symptoms of diarrhea and other stomach problems.

2. Rheumatism

The roots and leaves of this tree are first pounded and then applied in the form of a poultice to the affected part. The volatile oils penetrate the skin and reduce the symptoms of rheumatism.

3. Reduces Hypertension

Since Sambong tea is a diuretic, it can incite the body to remove excess fluids and even, sodium. As you already know, high levels of sodium in the blood can be a contributing factor in hypertension. Thus, drinking Sambong tea can help a lot.

4. Kidney Transplants

The extracts or tea from this plant can prevent or delay kidney problems. In fact, The Philippine National Kidney and Transplant Institute recommends us to take the extracts of this plant for similar ailments. The phytochemicals known as ‘terpenes’ can easily dissolve kidney stones. Some of the terpenes are limonene, b-pinene, sesquiterpenes, triteroenes, cryptomeridiol, borneol, camphor, a-pinene, 3-carene and monoterpenes.

5. Anti-cancer Properties

The methanolic effect of this herb exhibits anti-carcinogenic activity against hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

6. Antibacterial & Antifungal Properties

The magical components displaying these properties are cyptomeridiol, ß-carotene, lutein, and icthyothereol acetate, which can prevent harmful activities from microbes such as C. albicans, S. aureus, B. subtilis, A. niger.

7. Antioxidants

The ethylacetate extract of the leaves has, at least, nine flavonoids which act as antioxidants. They protect the human DNA from getting damaged because of free radicals.


Doctors Recommend Sambong For Treatment vs Kidney Stones

(Life Realities)

Abdominal pain, blood in the urine, recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI). These are the most common complaints of Dr. Frederick Mendiola’s patients suffering from kidney stones. Kidney stones are considered as one of the most common illnesses or disease affecting mostly middle-aged Filipinos today.

According to Dr. Mendiola, an invasive urologic surgeon at St. Luke’s Medical Center Global City, about 50 to 60 percent of his patients are inflicted with kidney stones. “Kidney problems are usually detected when a patient experiences abdominal pains and hematuria or blood in the urine,” he added. “However, there are also instances when a patient does not experience any of these. Instead, the most common symptom is a recurrent case of UTI. Therefore, it is highly recommended that patients visit a doctor regularly to prevent the illness.”

If left untreated, Mendiola said a patient may develop severe infection that will later affect the blood, leading to death. “It may also lead to chronic renal failure, destroying the kidney and its function, which will result in lifetime dialysis or a kidney transplant,” Mendiola said.

To prevent kidney stones, Dr. Mendiola advises to avoid diets which are high in sodium and uric acid. Some examples of these diets include dairy products, beans, nuts and shellfishes. “Aside from diet, patients with kidney stones also need something that will induce urine formation.” He suggests drinking three to four liters of liquid a day to prevent stone formation.

When it comes to medications, Dr. Mendiola says potassium citrate and sodium bicarbonate are effective in treating this condition if combined with sambong.

Potassium citrate and sodium bicarbonate can be obtained from certain prescription drugs. On the other hand, an optimum amount of sambong can be obtained from RE-LEAF Forte, made of processed organic sambong (Blumea balsamifera), a 2-in-1 medication that is not only an anti-urolithiasis but a diuretic as well.


Mugongre/Blumea balsamifera

(Kanak Hagjer, Blending Flavors)

One species of blumea that I grow is the Blumea balsamifera. Known as mugongre in my mother tongue, its leaves are mainly used for making our wickedly pungent shaphinyaba/chutney. The leaves have a fresh and sharp, almost citrusy, kind of smell. This post is to share some of the pictures that I took of the plant since November last year. In the wild they grow luxuriant with leaves that grow much larger than the ones shown here. This was planted in late October after my sister's trip to our good ol' hometown, Haflong. My mother had sent a few tiny ones from her garden. Although blumea varieties have no trouble surviving in the wild, they are not meant for a long journey in the heat!:) But I'm glad two survived and I could take some pictures of the stages through the months that they have flourished in my pots.

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-RNYaeb6FL_c/VU2oF55GXPI/AAAAAAAAIcw/qjfk1wRq0PQ/s400/DSC02439.JPG

Notice how dark that green looks. Leaves with serrated edges. This was taken in January when the buds first appeared on the plants.

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-gGsvJQn_BR4/VU2oszmJSiI/AAAAAAAAIc4/yNKFP8kZKdw/s400/DSC02437.JPG

The marigolds and other flowers were still blooming in my front yard then. According to the book on Indian Medicinal Plants: An Illustrated Dictionary by C.P. Khare which I checked online, Blumea balsamifera grows in subtropical Himalayas, Nepal, Sikkim, Assam, and Khasi Hills at 700-1350 m. Among the many medicinal properties of the plant, one is that it is a rich source of Ngai or blumea camphor. Camphor occurs in all parts of the plant but is mainly extracted from the leaves. The internet has several details about the medicinal values of this plant particularly in the Philippines and in China.

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-v9hg3Bco-yQ/VU2srkRxe7I/AAAAAAAAIdE/whfp1OTwk-o/s400/Recipes.jpg

By February the plant was full of blooms. And the butterflies spent leisurely moments feeding. It's worth growing blumea if the butterflies feed on them.:)

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-6jNb3ezsYGA/VU2uAumJwoI/AAAAAAAAIdM/zwCYXQwdQSI/s400/DSC03570.JPG

By the end of March, the flowers are dry and ready to be dispersed by the wind. And so the cycle continues. I may be swamped by several plants this year. Many will be given away but if I can feed the butterflies, it'll definitely be worth growing them in my garden! And once in a while, I'll pick and choose the tender leaves for the shaphinyaba/chutney that these leaves are meant for.


BLUMEA BALSAMIFERA

(mslisa, Medicinal {Plants 101)
Description:

It is a strongly aromatic herb that can reach up to 3 m tall. The stems are erect, coarse and half woody. The leaves are leathery in texture, serrated at the margins and narrowly oblong-shaped with tapered base. The aggregated flower heads are yellow, sometimes reddish yellow that is 6 to 7 mm long.

Health Benefits:

• Alleviates rheumatism • Diuretic agent • Known to dissolve kidney stones • Treatment of colds & fever • Anti-diarrheic properties • Relief of stomach pains and gas pains

Parts Utilized: Whole plant
Indications and Direction of Use:

1. Traumatic injuries, Abscesses, Boils - Fresh leaves that are crushed can be applied as poultice.

2. Arthritis, Rheumatism - Pound fresh leaves and mix it with coconut oil. Rub it over affected area. To relieve rheumatic pains on the back or waist - soak affected area with warm decoction of boiled blumea camphor leaves.

3.Headache - Use the pounded fresh leaves as poultice on the forehead and hold it in place with a clean piece of cloth. Some would mix the leaves with coconut oil before rubbing it on the forehead.

4. Cough and colds - the tea is used as an expectorant.

5. Gas pains(children)- rub the ointment consisting of crushed leaves and coconut oil.

Decoction of roots and leaves are also used for cystitis and fever. One can use the lukewarm decoction as a sponge bath. Tea is also used to cure diarrhea.



BLUMEA BALSAMIFERA

(LifeLive Halthy LifeLive)

Unani : Kakarondaa.

Action : Tranquilizer (used in excitement and insomnia), expectorant, sudorific. Given in intestinal diseases, colic, diarrhoea. Essential oil from leaves—hypotensive.

The plant is a source of Ngai or Blumea Camphor. Camphor occurs in all parts of the plant, but is generally extracted from leaves. Ngai Camphor oil consists almost entirely of l-borneol. It is redistilled to obtain the refined camphor for use in medicine.

The dried leaves contain sesquiter- pene lactones. These lactones exhibit antitumour activity against Yoshida sacoma cells in tissue culture.

The plant exhibits moderate antibacterial activity against E. coli.


Medicinal Benefits Of Sambong

(MarieA Experts Column)

Sambong with a scientific name of Blumea balsamifera is a medicinal plant that grows abundantly in the Philippines from Northern Luzon to Palawan and down south in Mindanao. It is commonly found in grasslands with altitudes that range from medium to high. Sambong is a weed thus it does not need extensive care for it to grow.

The botany of the shrub is described to have half woody and strongly aromatic and with soft hair. The shrub grows to about 1 to 4 meters high with stems that grow to about 2.5cm in diameter. Accordingly, the leaves are simple, alternate and broadly elongated that are about 7 to 20 centimeters long with toothed margins.

Long before the introduction of modern medicine in the rural areas, the leaves of the sambong shrub is prepared and drank as tea and thus was discovered to have expectorant as well as antispasmodic and anti diarrheal properties. The leaves were also often used as antiseptic for minor cuts and wounds. Today, together with the advances in modern medicine the sambong shrub is an alternative medicine in treating hypertension and rheumatism, colds and fever, dysentery, stomach pains and sore throat. Sambong also has diuretic properties as such it is also a cheap medicine that can help treat kidney disorders. This mighty shrub also helps in eliminating the body of excess water and salt.

Because of its many benefits, it is one of the ten herbal medicines that is approved and promoted by the Philippine Department of Health or DOH as an alternative medicine. The National Kidney Institute of the Philippines also promotes sambong in order to delay the need of dialysis or kidney transplant.

Below are the preparations of Sambong for treatment of various ailments:

Fever - a decoction of the roots of the sambong can be taken in as tea to cure fever. One can also boil at least 2-3 leaves of the plant and use the decoction for sponge bathing to bring down the fever.

Headache - crush or pound the leaves of the sambong and apply to forehead to relieve headache. Pounded leaves can also be used as poultice to treat boils.

Colds - a decoction of the leaves can be taken in as tea as an expectorant. The sambong tea is also effective in treating upset stomach.

For daily use- since sambong contains diuretic properties, 2 teaspoons of chopped sambong leaves can be boiled with 2 glasses of water for about fifteen minutes. This can then be taken in as tea 3 to 4 times a day.


Sambong for Menstruation

(All About Diabetes)

Sambong (Blumea balsamifera) is a native flowering or weed that is endemic in the Philippines and other tropical countries. It is a popular herb especially for its healing properties including antidiarrhetic, antigastralgic, expectorant, stomachic, and antispasmodic, among others. Aside from these, sambong is also popular for being emmenagogues, or for stimulating menstruation or the blood flow in the pelvic area and uterus.

As such, sambong is specially use for treating menstrual cramps or dysmenorrhea. This is the painful spasm that is commonly experienced by women in their belly and pelvic region during menstruation. While some menstrual cramps are mild, some are severely painful that they can obstruct hinder a woman from performing his regular activities for several days. Sambong helps in reliving menstrual cramps or dysmenorrhea by stimulating blood flow thereby helping women in releasing the molecular compounds called prostaglandins, which causes the uterus to contract and constrict the blood supply that causes the menstrual cramps.

As cure for menstrual cramps, the sambong leaves are boiled to create a sambong tea, which is then consumed by the patient. Aside from easing the painful cramps by facilitating menstruation, sambong also helps in cleaning the kidneys. The plant is actually especially known as a natural cleansing herb. Since the plant is emmenagogues, drinking the sambong tea is not advisable to pregnant women as well as women who wanted to be pregnant. Moreover, drinking sambong should also be regulated because it also has hallucinogenic effects when excessively consumed.


Legarda bill seeks payment for indigenous peoples’ herbal medicines

(VS, GMA News)

Indigenous peoples (IPs) should be recognized and compensated as the source of traditional knowledge on herbal medicines used by pharmaceutical companies in commercial quantities, Sen. Loren Legarda said Wednesday.

"Today, these herbal medicines have been turned into capsules and syrups... by pharmaceutical companies who have done further research on these plants,” Legarda said at the Forum on Intellectual Property and Traditional Knowledge at the National Museum in Manila.

“We hope that our IPs will be accorded with proper recognition and gain themselves access to these better medications," the senator noted.

These herbal cures for various ailments include lagundi, guava leaves and ampalaya leaves, Legarda said, adding, "The gumamela has been used to treat sores and lesions, while sambong is known to help cure coughs and colds."

"It is in this light that I filed a proposed legislation under Senate Bill 2831 of the Traditional Property Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act, which seeks to make an inventory of all cultural properties and mandate the payment of royalties to our indigenous peoples for the use of these cultural properties. I hope this becomes a law before the year ends," Legarda told the forum.

Apart from protecting indigenous knowledge and cultural heritage, her measure aims to stop local and foreign entities from stealing indigenous knowledge, dances and designs.

In the senator’s definition, traditional knowledge include arts and crafts, music and literature, health care, agriculture, forestry and fishing, mining and architecture.

The Indigenous Peoples Rights Act of 1997 lack specific provisions to protect IPs’ cultural properties, according to her.

"Moreover, the Intellectual Property Office of the Philippines does not have the legal mandate nor the expertise or capability to undertake such protection of our indigenous cultural treasures," Legarda added.

Legarda also helped launch the first gallery for indigenous Philippine textiles located at the National Museum building, with an initial display of hand woven and stitched fabrics.


Sambong (Blumea balsamifera) Description and Uses

(Healthy Life Opt)

The Sambong, or Blumea Balsamifera, is found from northern Luzon to Palawan and Mindanao, in all or most island and provinces. It is usually common in open grasslands at low and medium altitudes. It is also reported from India to southern China and through Malaya to the Moluccas.

This plant is a course, tall, erect, halfwoody, strongly aromatic herb which is densely and softly hairy and 1.5 to 3 meters in height. The stems grow up to 2.5 centimeters in diameter. The leaves are elliptic- to oblong-lanceolate, 7 to 20 centimeters long, toothed at the margins, pointed blunt at the tip, and narrowed to the short petiole, which is often auricled or appendaged. The flowering heads are stalked, yellow, numerous 6 to 7 millimeters long, and borne on branches of a large terminal, spreading or pyramidal, leafy panicle. The involucral bracts are green, narrow, and hairy. The achenes are 10-ribbed and silky.

Sambong would be worth cultivating in the Philippines as a source of camphor. Experiments in Indo-China as cited by Bacon show that it is possible to Obtain 50,000 kilos of leaves per hectare per year, which would give a possible borneol yield of from 50 to 200 kilos per hectare. He says that l-borneol is easily oxidized to camphor.

Filipinos drink an infusion of the leaves as a substitute for tea. Burkill quotes Boorsma [Teysmannia 29 (1981) 329], who states that the leaves are sometimes smoked in Sumatra in place of Indian hemp but are not narcotic.

Wehmer records that the leaves and stem contain a volatile oil (Ngai camphor oil) which consists of l-borneol 25 per cent, l0camphor 75 per cent, a little cineol, limonene, sesquiterpene, alcohol, and phenol phloracetophenon-dimethyl ether. Bacon, after studying Philippine material, reports that the leaves contain from 0.1 to 0.4 per cent of a yellow oil with a camphorlike odor. He states that the oil is an almost pure form of l-borneol.

Sanyal and Ghose report that the drug causes contraction of muscular fibers, mucous membranes, and other tissues.

According to Father Clain the juice of the leaves of the powdered leaves are used as a vulnerary. Guerrero reports that the roots are used locally as a cure for colds. The leaves are applied to the forehead to relieve headache. An infusion is used as a bath for women in childbirth. A tea made from the leaves is used for stomach pains. A decoction of the leaves as an antidiarhetic and antigastralgic. The decoction is used also for aromatic baths in rheumatism.

The Pharmacopoeia of India record that the plant possesses a strong camphoraceous odor and a pungent taste. It quotes Horsfied [As. Journ., vol. 8, p. 272], who says that a warm infusion of the plant acts as a powerful sudorific; it is in very general use among the Javanese and Chinese, as an expectorant. Several European medical men, practicing at Sumarang, assured Horsfield that they had repeatedly employed it in catarrhal affections. Loureiro mentions the use of the leaves in Indo-China as a stomachic, antispasmodic, and emmenagogue. Caius says that in Cambodia they are used externally in scabies. Nadkarni reports that the fresh juice of the leaves is dropped into the eyes for chronic, purulent discharges. Internally, the decoction is both astringent and anthelmintic. It is given for worms and also in dysentery and chronic uterine discharges. The powder of the leaves is used as snuff. Burkill reports that the Malays value sambong very highly as a sudorific, stomachic, and anthelmintic, and menorrhagia. In the case of fever a decoction of the leaves is often given, or a decoction of the leaves and roots together. The leaves are also used for beriberi. The leaves are crushed and applied externally as a styptic on wounds. A lotion made from boiled leaves is used for lumbago and rheumatism, for bathing women after childbirth, and for soothing the skin of children.



Salamat Dok: Therapeutic benefits of sambong plant

By Stefano Gelano (Salamat Dok)

Have you ever experienced difficulty urinating or felt excruciating pain in your kidneys because of stones?

The medicinal plant “sambong” could be a remedy for that.

Sambong, also known as “Blumea balsamifera,” or “Blumea camphor,” is an aromatic shrub that grows from one to four meters in height. It is a shrub that grows wild in the tropical climate countries such as Philippines, as well as India, Africa and even in eastern Himalayas.

Although considered a weed in some places, it is prized in the Philippines for its medicinal properties. Among these is its diuretic property, which help release water from the body. It can also help pass urinary stones through the urine.

USAGE/INTAKE

Infusion. Sambong leaves are generally boiled and taken as a tea. You may gather fresh leaves and chop them into small pieces then wash under running water thoroughly. Toss the chopped leaves into a liter of boiling water. Steep the leaves for 10 minutes then let the tea cool. The tea may be taken four times a day.

Poultice. Sambong may also be used to relieve arthritis colds and cough. To prepare, crush or grind the leaves into a paste and apply directly into the affected part. Plaster. To relieve fever, crushed Sambong leaves must be soaked in cold water, wrung out and placed between sheets of clean cloth. The cloth plaster may then be placed on the patient’s forehead or armpit to lower the body temperature and prevent convulsions.


Nueva Ecija organic farm promotes medicinal plants

(Philippine Star)

MANILA, Philippines - Green as far as the eye can see. This is what greets farmers every day at the Leonie Agri Corp. (LAC) farm, a 42-hectare verdant tract in the northern Nueva Ecija town of Sta. Rosa.

Look closely and you will see among the plants are sambong and lagundi. This is where parent company Pascual Laboratories has been sourcing the medicinal plants for its Releaf and Ascof brands, respectively — herbal products which won Silver Awards at the 25th International Exhibition for Inventions, New Techniques and Products in Geneva, Switzerland in 1997.

Sambong and lagundi leaves are harvested and pre-processed into herbal raw materials right on the farm — in a facility which conforms to pharmaceutical manufacturing standards.

The leaves undergo washing and spin-drying, oven-drying, milling, sterilization and then packaging. The stringent quality control methods meet the regulations of the Bureau of Food and Drugs. Pascual Laboratories handles the validation of the results.

In line with the LAC’s mission to promote healthcare by producing organically grown medicinal herbal raw materials and agricultural products, crops on the farm are cultivated sans pesticides and synthetic chemicals. Other organic practices include composting and vermiculture.

The LAC is certified by the Organic Certification Center of the Philippines as the first organic farm in the country and is a member of the Organic Producers Trade Association of the Philippines. Business ( Article MRec ), pagematch: 1, sectionmatch: 1

LAC president Guillermo Saret recalls that the land was not always this fertile. The townsfolk used to call it lupang sinumpa (cursed land) because it was barren, save for weeds such as talahib and cogon — indicators of the soil’s acidity.

But when the farmers discovered a swamp beside the farm and transformed it into an irrigation system, a remarkable increase in organic matter and soil nutrients turned the land into lupang pangako (blessed land).

Today, aside from medicinal plants, the LAC farm also produces a slew of internationally recognized products and has also expanded its operations to organic vegetables and livestock.



An ethnobotanical approach to drug discovery: The case of Bali

By Wawan Sujarwo (The Jakarta Post)

Ethnobotany falls within the 'knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe', which constitute humanity's intangible cultural heritage, as defined by UNESCO in 2003. This declaration was fundamental towards the recognition of orally transmitted traditional knowledge systems as an integral part of cultural heritages needing protection.

Ethnobotany is important in tropical countries where cultures are undergoing rapid change. Many scientists have stressed the urgent need of ethnobotanical documentation to contrast the rapid decline of TK due to plant extinction and, above all, to the disappearance of traditional cultures.

The field of medicinal plants now seems highly relevant for efforts to improve biodiversity in medicinal culture. We were surprised by traditional Chinese medicine, which finally won a researcher the Nobel Prize. This success came when an ancient text revealed a method of using qinghao, the Chinese name for sweet wormwood, to extract artemisinin.

It is important to document plants traditionally consumed within a particular geographical and cultural context. Such documentation is also necessary to understand cultural issues related to medicinal acceptance and to develop insights into the investigation of phytochemical compounds.

Bali is extremely interesting for the study of humanity's intangible cultural heritage due to its well preserved Hindu temples, and to its rich cultural landscape ' the subak, an irrigation system for paddy fields unique to Bali was listed as a UNESCO world heritage site in 2012 ' and a valuable immaterial cultural heritage is preserved in Balinese daily life. _______________________________________

Many of the medicinal plants obtained in Bali are considered tasty.

The Balinese believe that all diseases can be cured with the help of nature. Like the Javanese and other cultures, the Balinese also believe God has provided a medicine for any disease. Therefore, it is part of the Balinese culture to look for medicinal plants to solve health problems.

As in many other regions, herbal remedies remain Bali's cornerstone of treatment of most diseases. Though synthetic medical products have become common since early 20th century, the use of folk remedies is still high, especially in Java and Bali.

The last few decades has seen increased interest in natural products with medicinal properties 'especially tropical plants in forests within the Pacific Rim. Only recently have researchers begun to investigate their pharmacological properties.

To assess the medicinal significance for traditional ethnobotanical knowledge of plant species in a relevant area, a use value was introduced in ethnobotanical study. Its value is based on the number of uses and the number of people that cite a given plant, and has been widely used within the community to indicate the plants considered most important by a given population.

Qualitative data, such as lists of used plants, are insufficient to clarify the specific role played by a given species within a given ethnic group. Quantitative indices make it possible to quantify the role that a given plant plays within a particular culture, and the use value is used to evaluate and classify these plants according to their respective medicinal significance.

Many of the medicinal plants obtained in Bali are considered tasty. Elderly people tend to appreciate their flavor and see this as a sign of medicinal properties. My findings show that plants with very high medicinal values are pulai (blackboard tree or Alstonia scholaris), sambong (Blumea balsamifera), kayu manis (Indonesian cinnamon or Cinnamomum burmanni), and sirih (betel or Piper betle).

In the case of pulai, for example, more than 400 different compounds have been isolated, and the plant is very rich in alkaloids and contains steroids, flavanoids and triterpenoids. The plant has a validated activity against the Plasmodium berghei parasite supporting its use to treat malaria. Sambong has many activities, including antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective and other pharmacological activities that are still unknown.

The medicinal use of Indonesian cinnamon is legendary. This plant is widely commercialized and is known as 'Indonesian Cassia' or 'Batavia Cassia'. The Balinese use this plant for various purposes from cooking to medicine. Sirih has many pharmacological activities. The plant resides in the heart of the Balinese culture, and it is incorporated in various practices and uses from wedding ceremonies to medicine.

I believe the findings will provide quality information on how and why people use plants and will contribute to the conservation of biological and cultural diversity.


The Health Benefits of Sambong Herb

(Healthy Benefits)

Sambong is a shrub that grows wild in the tropical climate countries such as Philippines, India, and Africa and found even in eastern Himalayas. It is an aromatic shrub, which grows from 1 to 4 meters in height. It is considered as an herb in some countries and is difficult to eradicate. It is used to treat infected wounds, respiratory infections, and stomach pains in Thai and Chinese folk medicine. Experiments have shown the ability of sambong to fight cancer cells, particularly in liver carcinoma and leukaemia. Further studies are being conducted to consider the added benefits of including sambong in cancer treatments. Sambong is said to be one of 10 herbs that have been approved by the Department of Health in the Philippines as being effective in treating a variety of health conditions.

In ancient days before the introduction of modern medicine in the rural areas, the leaves of the sambong shrub is prepared and drank as tea and thus was discovered to have expectorant as well as anti-spasmodic and anti-diarrheal properties. The leaves were also often used as anti-septic for minor cuts and wounds. Today, together with the advances in modern medicine the sambong shrub is an alternative medicine in treating hypertension and rheumatism, colds and fever, dysentery, stomach pains and sore throat. Also, the leaves of sambong help control diarrhoea and relieve stomach pains. Traditionally, sambong leaves are ground to a paste and applied to the stomach.

It is commonly used in capsule form in the treatment of kidney disorders. Doctors in the Philippines routinely prescribe sambong for the dissolution of kidney stones. Sambong is also high in essential oils, and contains significant amounts of camphor oil.

To make sambong tea, boil the leaves in drinking water and make it simmer for about ten-fifteen minutes, get ready this tea and retailer it in a thoroughly clean container. Drink this tea all through the day, at minimum three-4 occasions for greatest advantages. The odour is fragrant and pungent but also calming at the same time.


Uses and Preparation of Sambong (Blumea balsamifera)

(Traditional Medicine News)

Description: the plant grows 1 1/2 to 3 meters in height. The leaves give a rough feeling when touched. How to plant Sambong: Plant the sprout (with 3 or more leaves) taken from the sides of the main plant in a shady area.

How to Take Care of the Plant: Water the plant everyday. Remove the weeds and grass around it.

Harvesting and Proper storage:
• Harvest only mature and healthy leaves. Make sure that there are leaves left on the plant to prevent the plant from dying.
• Dry the leaves to be stored.
• Store in a sealed plastic bag or tightly covered brown jar or bottle.
Used for:
• Swelling
• Increased urination
Preparation:
• Chop the leaves and place them in an earthen jar according to the following amounts:
For Dried Leaves:
• ADULTS = 4 tbspful
• 7-12 y/o = 2 tbspful
For Fresh Leaves:
• ADULTS = 6 tbspful
• 7-12 y/o = 3 tbspful
• Pour in 2 glassfuls of water. Cover it.
• Bring the mixture to a boil.
• Remove the cover and let it continue to boil for another 15 minutes or until the 2 glassfuls of water originally poured have been reduced to 1 glassful.
• Let 1 cool, then strain the mixture.
How to Use:
• Divide the decoction into 3 parts and drink 1 part 3 times a day.

Health Benefits of Sambong – An Alternative Remedy

(Drink Benefits)

Sambong is a herbal medicine usually grows in the Philippines in an open grasslands, and a widely used herbal treatment in the country. It is known for its remarkable treatment for kidney stones, rheumatism, coughs and colds, hypertension, heart disease and anti-diarrhea. The taste of this herbal medicine is horrifying in plain infusion. Adding sugar and lemon would give you a better and desirable taste, but you still can perceive the bitter after taste.

Listed below are the possible uses of Sambong for various ailments:

• Stomach pain reliever
• Hypertension and Rheumatism treatment
• Good as a diuretic agent
• For fever, coughs and cold treatment
• Removes worms
• Dysentery and sore throat treatment
• Effective in dissolving kidney stones

Preparations of Sambong for some common ailments are as follows:

Fever. A decoction of sambong roots can be taken to cure fever. Boil at least 2-3 leaves of plant and use the decoction for sponge bathing to bring down the fever.

Colds. Take a decoction of sambong leaves as an expectorant. It is also effective in treating upset stomach.

Headache. Crushed and pounded the leaves of sambong and apply it on forehead to relieve headache.

If you are recovering from fever, or have just given birth, a decoction of sambong are being suggest to used for taking a bath.

In treating wounds and cuts, sambong juice can also do the act.

With the help of Sambong roots and leaves, rheumatism can also be used as herbal medicine treatment. A pounded leaves and roots of sambong can be applied on the affected parts. It can also be boiled and apply a warm compress into the affected area.

Sambong can be used everyday, since it contains diuretic properties.

It works as a diuretic because it removes excess fluid and sodium from the body through urine. The excess sodium in the system contributes to high blood pressure, diuretics are used to alleviate the condition. Boil two teaspoons of chopped sambong leaves into a two glasses of water for about 15 minutes. It could be taken for 3-4 times a day.

However, if you have hypertension, you need to consult your doctor first before trying sambong to ensure that it will not conflict with other medicines you take.

Recently, sambong has been registered in the Bureau of Foods and Drugs as medicine, and the Department of Health has been promoting this herbal tea and tablets as a diuretic and dissolution of kidney stones.


Sambong

(Green Queen Diaries)

When my only son was in college, he would show me the skin allergy on his back which would become more pronounced every time he would play basketball. Perhaps his clothes were not rinsed properly so I would always remind our helper to rinse them well.

Finally took him to Boy Fajardo and he advised me to switch to Victoria Laundry soap . He also told my son to shower with sambong leaves boiled in water. The sambong leaves could be bought in Quiapo from a vendor named ' Nora Aunor. ' ( not the singer ) .

I told my staff to buy P200 worth of sambong leaves in Quiapo . Little did I know that she would be bringing home two heavy sacks of sambong. She even had to take a taxi just to bring them home!

Our cook boiled the leaves in a huge vat of water, and we would all use it for our daily baths for a week as we had an oversupply of sambong. The scent of the sambong was very mild. It was a mix of citrus and woody elements. It reminded me of camphor.

Later on, I read that the sambong has astringent properties , our grandparents must have used them as sponge baths . Some people would even immerse their body parts that had arthritis just to help them heal faster!

I will remind my only son to remind me to take my sambong baths if I get arthritis in my old age!


Medicinal Benefits of Sambong

(Marie A, Knoji)

Sambong with a scientific name of Blumea balsamifera is a medicinal plant that grows abundantly in the Philippines and is the most common herbal medicine because of its diuretic properties.

Sambong with a scientific name of Blumea balsamifera is a medicinal plant that grows abundantly in the Philippines from Northern Luzon to Palawan and down south in Mindanao. It is commonly found in grasslands with altitudes that range from medium to high. Sambong is a weed thus it does not need extensive care for it to grow.

The botany of the shrub is described to have half woody and strongly aromatic and with soft hair. The shrub grows to about 1 to 4 meters high with stems that grow to about 2.5cm in diameter. Accordingly, the leaves are simple, alternate and broadly elongated that are about 7 to 20 centimeters long with toothed margins.

Long before the introduction of modern medicine in the rural areas, the leaves of the sambong shrub is prepared and drank as tea and thus was discovered to have expectorant as well as antispasmodic and anti diarrheal properties. The leaves were also often used as antiseptic for minor cuts and wounds. Today, together with the advances in modern medicine the sambong shrub is an alternative medicine in treating hypertension and rheumatism, colds and fever, dysentery, stomach pains and sore throat. Sambong also has diuretic properties as such it is also a cheap medicine that can help treat kidney disorders. This mighty shrub also helps in eliminating the body of excess water and salt.

Because of its many benefits, it is one of the ten herbal medicines that is approved and promoted by the Philippine Department of Health or DOH as an alternative medicine. The National Kidney Institute of the Philippines also promotes sambong in order to delay the need of dialysis or kidney transplant.

Below are the preparations of Sambong for treatment of various ailments:

Fever- a decoction of the roots of the sambong can be taken in as tea to cure fever. One can also boil at least 2-3 leaves of the plant and use the decoction for sponge bathing to bring down the fever.

Headache- crush or pound the leaves of the sambong and apply to forehead to relieve headache. Pounded leaves can also be used as poultice to treat boils.

Colds- a decoction of the leaves can be taken in as tea as an expectorant. The sambong tea is also effective in treating upset stomach.

For daily use- since sambong contains diuretic properties, 2 teaspoons of chopped sambong leaves can be boiled with 2 glasses of water for about fifteen minutes. This can then be taken in as tea 3 to 4 times a day.


Sambong for treatment of kidney stone

(PCHRD)

Abdominal pain, blood in the urine, recurrent urinary infection (UTI). These are the most common complaints of Dr. Frederick Mendiolas patients suffering from kidney stones. Kidney stones are considered as one of the most common illnesses or disease affecting mostly middle-aged Filipinos today.

According to Mendiola, an invasive urologic surgeon at St. Lukes Medical Center Global City, about 50 to 60 percent of his patients are inflicted with kidney stones. “Kidney problems are usually detected when a patients experiences abdominal pains and hematuria or blood in the urine, he says. “However, there are also instances when a patient does not experience any of these. Instead, the most common symptom is a recurrent case of UTI. Therefore, it is highly recommended that patients visit a doctor regularly to prevent the illness.

If left untreated, Mendiola says a patient may develop severe infection that will later affect the blood, leading to death. “It may also lead to chronic renal failure, destroying the kidney and its function, which will result in lifetime dialysis or a kidney transplant, he adds. Although this illness is more common to occur in males, it is imperative for women to have themselves checked up once they feel any of the above-mentioned symptoms.

To prevent kidney stones, Mendiola advises patients to avoid diets which are high in sodium and uric acid. Some examples of these diets include dairy products, beans, nuts and shellfishes. “Aside from diet, patient with kidney stones also need something that will induce urine formation. He suggests drinking three to four liter of liquid to prevent stone formation. When it comes to medications, Mendiola says potassium citrate and sodium bicarbonate are effective in treating this condition if combined with Sambong.

Potasium citrate and sodium bicarbonate can be obtained from certain prescription drugs. On the other hand, an optimum amount of Sambong ca be obtained from Re-Leaf Forte, made of processed organic Sambong (Blumea balsamifera), a two-in-one medication that is not only anti-urolithiasis but a diuretic as well.

Studies show that Sambong is effective in preventing calcium and uric acid kidney stone formation as well as in helping stones from lower urinary tract to pass spontaneously.


The Healing Powers of SAMBONG

(Watz Neo)

SAMBONG with scientific name Blumea balsamifera, blumea camphor in english and Gabon in Mindanao is one of a few herbs recently registered with the Bureau of Food and Drugs (BFAD) as medicine. Today sambong is available in capsule or tea that are available in the leading drugstore nationwide. That's why, some of the doctors today recommend their patients to use the sambong tablets for their fatty liver problems and kidney stones. Sambong will treat kidney problems and not only that Sambong is also good for:

1. Gaseous distention. How to use? Boil sambong leaves (1 tbsp if dried, 2 tbsps if fresh) in 1 cup of water for 5 minutes. Strain and drink while lukewarm. For children ages 7-12 years old, use half of the adult dose.
2. Abscess (Boil). Pound fresh sambong leaves then apply as poultice over boil once a day.
3. Fever. Boil 2 to 4 handfuls of sambong leaves for 5 minutes. When lukewarm, use it to sponge the feverish patient.
4. Headache. Heat fresh sambong leaves over low fire. Crush and apply on forehead and temples. Wrap with cloth bandage to keep them in place.
5. Sinusitis. Roll chopped ried leaves in clean paper like that of a cigarette and puff on it.
6. for colds, sore throat, and as an expectorant. rink tea leaves 3 or more times a day.
7. in treating rheumatism. Crush or pound leaves and mix with coconut oil. Apply mixture directly to aching joints.

Not only that, there are several study show the potential healing powers of sambong as:

1. Anti-cancer- initial findings show that the blumeatin extracted from sambong leaves may protect our liver from damage as it tends to inhibit the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma cells without cytotoxicity, whether the cells are from mice or people.
2. Antifungal. Phytochemical study of sambong leaves yielded icthyothereol acetate, cyptomeridiol, lutein and B-carotene. Antimicrobial tests showed activity against A niger, T mentagrophytes and C albicans.
3. Urolithiasis. A study shows sambong to be a promising chemolytic agent, a method of dissolving calculi or kidney stones.

How to Make Sambong Tea

(Marvin, Food Recap)

I got a cold and cough during the last typhoon Basyang. Mother told me that sambong is a natural cough remedy. She also reminded me not to abused my body with lots of chemically prepared drugs.

Since I do not have the ready made sambong tea like what my friend Ida gave me. I went to nearby river bank to find some sambong leaves. But I went home empty handed. Then I went to my neighbors hoping to find one.

Finally, I got some sambong leaves. I prefer young and undamaged leaves but those are already gotten by the plant owner. At least, I got some to cure my illness. Few brown spots would have no effects somehow.

I washed it with running water and brought it to low boiling for ten minutes. I never boiled it too much cause it might destroy the natural curing substances. You may want to measure the leaves and water for the purpose of standardization. More leaves means greater curing effect but it might render your tea undrinkable.

Do it yourself sambong tea has a grassy flavor and nothing else. Adding sugar will make it more delectable.

I feel better every time I sat on my table with a cup of sambong tea and I can watch my favorite Bleach Anime quietly beside my sleeping baby.


Green living, according to Elizabeth Sy

By Marge C. Enriquez (Philippine Daily Inquirer)

The balcony on a top floor of a high-rise opens to the sky, welcoming the cool winds and sunlight, often obscured by the clouds.

“I looked at my phone (weather app) today. It read that Makati was going to be hazy while Manila would be sunny,” remarks Elizabeth Sy, president of SM Hotel and Conventions Corporation, who is also an environmentalist and an advocate of holistic health.

Nonetheless, a veritable vegetable and herb garden thrives in the heart of Makati, where Sy gets her salads and teas. Making the most of the good light and the cool winds, the balcony is decked with ledges and weatherworn benches for pots filled with spring onions, kangkong, thyme, alugbati, lemongrass, dill, sage, pandan, red guava, lemon-basil, marjoram, black pepper, red ginger and goji berries.

Sy credits her household helper, Queenie Lavilla, for transforming the outdoor space into an edible greenery which grows much of the hotelier’s food. It has produced purple yam, corn and lime, and even flowering plants such as Indian beads. The plants are layered on top of one another and bloom at various times of the year. The pots are filled with quality organic soil and augmented with organic compost. Food scraps from the kitchen are turned into plant food.

“We use an herbal compost activator and we spray with enzymes,” says Sy.

Lavilla then points to sambong (Blumea balsamifera), an herb used for fever and coughs.

Sy maintains she doesn’t get coughs or even morning sniffles, common to most people living in polluted cities. When her friends in and past midlife complain about the aches that come with age, Sy is amused. “What are they talking about? They are surprised that I hardly even get coughs and colds.”

She admits that, after a certain age, she has become more careful about her diet and lifestyle.

Going green

Sy recalls that when she was 20, she met master yogi and poet Rolando Carbonell, who posed this challenge: “Do you want your stomach to be a cemetery of carcasses or a garden of vegetables?”

The balcony on a top floor of a high-rise opens to the sky, welcoming the cool winds and sunlight, often obscured by the clouds.

“I looked at my phone (weather app) today. It read that Makati was going to be hazy while Manila would be sunny,” remarks Elizabeth Sy, president of SM Hotel and Conventions Corporation, who is also an environmentalist and an advocate of holistic health.

Nonetheless, a veritable vegetable and herb garden thrives in the heart of Makati, where Sy gets her salads and teas. Making the most of the good light and the cool winds, the balcony is decked with ledges and weatherworn benches for pots filled with spring onions, kangkong, thyme, alugbati, lemongrass, dill, sage, pandan, red guava, lemon-basil, marjoram, black pepper, red ginger and goji berries.

Sy credits her household helper, Queenie Lavilla, for transforming the outdoor space into an edible greenery which grows much of the hotelier’s food. It has produced purple yam, corn and lime, and even flowering plants such as Indian beads. The plants are layered on top of one another and bloom at various times of the year. The pots are filled with quality organic soil and augmented with organic compost. Food scraps from the kitchen are turned into plant food.

“We use an herbal compost activator and we spray with enzymes,” says Sy.

Lavilla then points to sambong (Blumea balsamifera), an herb used for fever and coughs.

Sy maintains she doesn’t get coughs or even morning sniffles, common to most people living in polluted cities. When her friends in and past midlife complain about the aches that come with age, Sy is amused. “What are they talking about? They are surprised that I hardly even get coughs and colds.”

She admits that, after a certain age, she has become more careful about her diet and lifestyle.

Going green

Sy recalls that when she was 20, she met master yogi and poet Rolando Carbonell, who posed this challenge: “Do you want your stomach to be a cemetery of carcasses or a garden of vegetables?”

Breakfast is oat milk or cashew milk mixed with energy-boosting hemp hearts, flaxseed, brewer’s yeast and maca root powder. She eschews dairy milk because it is believed to produce mucus. Lunch is a salad, and dinner is soup with herbal teas. Her drinking water is purified by Bio Disc, a machine that treats its energy and mineral content. The revitalized water improves the transfer of nutrients in the body.

During her free time, Sy reads up on holistic health trends. One of her discoveries is a a health elixir, kombucha, a fermented mixture of sweetened tea and a mother culture called scoby (symbiotic colony of bacteria and yeast). Sy says it tastes like cider vinegar, with a slight kick from the alcohol content.

Buying the mother culture in Canada, she has been brewing her own beverage. The mother culture, which looks like a gelatinous mushroom, is mixed with black tea, made from filtered water. It is stored in a 500-ml jar and covered with a kitchen towel. The fermentation and cultivation of the culture takes more than a week. The mother colony continually reproduces so Sy has a regular supply for her brew.

Kombucha is believed to detox the body, improve the digestive system, promote the enzymes, and boost the immune system, and has anti-aging effects.

The effects of grain and nut milks and kombucha tea were shown in her medical exam. “My cholesterol level went down,” she says.

To keep limber, Sy practices yoga with certified teacher Alynne Dulay, while facing her urban rooftop garden.

The minimalism of her residence reflects her simplicity. Done in a soothing neutral color scheme, the house is furnished only with essential furniture and hardly any adornment, making it very spacious and light-filled. “That’s to let in the good chi,” she says. For every new acquisition, something has to be discarded to

Pictures of Blumea camphora (Sambong) – Blumea balsamifera